Unique Amilcars Are Latest Footman James Concours Entries

Friday 24 June 2016

Two unique Amilcars with long and varied histories are the latest entries to the Footman James Concours d?Elegance.

The Amilcar marque was founded in France in 1921, and the Amilcar factory in Saint-Denis manufactured cars until 1940. Starting out with cyclecars, the company soon flourished and began designing far more sporting and extravagant cars. Every Amilcar was handmade, so the 1920s C6 and C0 differ from any other models still in existence.

The Amilcar C6, chassis number 11014, was originally designed to be a road-going sports car, but it had very little room for additional passengers and was soon established as a race car. Registered in 1927, the C6 was initially bought by a consortium of Cambridge undergraduates who raced it at the Inter-Varsity hill climb on Ewelme Down in 1928, where it won the 1100cc class and set the fastest time of the day.

It was then raced in 1930 by Bob Porter, who won his class in the BRDC 500 Mile Outer Circuit race at an average speed of 88mph, with an overall time of 6 hours 20 minutes.

Sold several times in quick succession, the car was then bought in a dismantled state by Edvard Paul Zere, who cut triangular sections from the side rails to lighten it – these are still evident today. Zere never raced the car and it was sold in 1949 to a group of friends, including John Tozer. Tozer won a huge number of VSCC competitions in the C6 between 1954 and 1962.

It was sold twice more before current owner, Michael Gluckman, bought it in 2010, and the C6 has been lovingly restored to its original specification by Thornley Kelham in Gloucestershire.

The Amilcar C0, chassis number 11052, has also been part of Michael Gluckman’s collection since 2009. The 1929 model came with a three lobe blower, which seems to be the only one in existence. It also had an extra large fuel tank, which required modification to the rear of the chassis and different rear shock absorbers.

While the C6 has a more extensive race history, the C0 was also used for motorsport throughout the early 1930s and was owned by a number of French racing drivers. Rene Ducreux then took ownership of it in 1946, moving the oil tank and fitting it with a modern-looking full body and Dubonnet front suspension.

When Michael bought it, the C0 initially seemed to be in fairly good shape. However, it soon became clear that it needed a full rebuild, and Michael enlisted the help of Thornley Kelham once again to restore the C0 to its former glory.

We’re pleased to say that both Amilcars are now running smoothly and we’re delighted to welcome them to the Footman James Concours d’Elegance. Although they make quite the pair, it’ll be up to you to decide which one you think should gain the top prize at the Concours!

  • Amilcar C0 at Chateau Impney Hill Climb, Droitwich
  • Amilcar C6 at Chateau Impney Hill Climb, Droitwich
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